My 71 beetle has been sitting for awhile and now it won't run. I took the carb off and had it rebuilt but it still won't idle. I only seem to be getting fuel when i pump the accelerator. Is this still a carb problem or engine problem. thanks for your help!!
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Wayne
Who rebuilt your carb? Could it be that the carb was incorrectly rebuilt? The VW Shop manual suggests idle adjustment incorrect, pilot jet blocked, air leak in manifold or a problem with the vacuum lines. Check your fuel pump to see if it's working properly and if you have a fuel filter make sure that it's not blocked.
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I know it isn't the fuel pump as the carb bowl is full. It was pretty gummed up (hadn't run in two years) but he, (the guy that rebuilt it) is pretty knowledgeable in carbs for vw's and has worked on them before. I blew air through all the jets that I could think of and had air going through them. I played with the idle and that didn't do anything. Where is the jet that you are talking about, and the vacuum line only goes from the carb to distrib. and I don't see any leaks there. Can I block the vacuum line port on carb to distrib. and see if that does anything or must I have it attached to distrib. to make it idle. Thank you for your help.
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Wayne
Here's some info from Tech Talk with Rick from SuperBeetles.com;

Once you have put your ignition system in good order, adjusted your valves and made sure that your compression is good you can move on to the carburetor. The only two adjustments that can be made is to the idle speed which is done by turning the screw on the throttle arm or on the later 34 PICT by turning the big by-pass screw on the left side of the carb.

The other adjustment is the idle volume control screw on the lower left side of the carb recognizable by the spring around the base on the older carbs and just below the by-pass screw on the later. This adjustment is simple. Warm the engine and make sure that the choke plate is wide open in the top of the carb. Adjust the idle speed to what sounds about normal (600 -900rpm). Turn the volume control screw in until the engine starts to noticeably slow down. Now back it back out until it smoothes out again and then turn it an additional ½ turn out. You may want to readjust the idle speed.

The most common problem to carburetors is dirt. This often comes in through the fuel line from the bottom of the fuel tank. A fuel filter in the line leading to the fuel pump can usually stop the dirt before it gets to the carb but be sure to check the filter occasionally. If the filter is getting full quickly you may need to clean or replace the tank. The other place dirt can enter the carb is in the air so always run an air cleaner. The first place dirt will usually cause a problem is at the needle and seat valve. It will either stop it up cutting off the fuel or make it stick open flooding the motor. Sometimes a temporary fix is just to tap on the top of the carb to dislodge the dirt. Usually you will need to clean the needle and seat by removing the screws from the top of the carb (and the throttle spring on 34 PICT). By lifting off the top you can see the brass needle and seat valve screwed into it.

Maybe this will help.
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Wayne
Here's a reply from Rick Higgins of Bug Me Video
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It sounds like it is still a carb problem. Idle jet and main jet are likely both stopped up.


Here's how to rebuild it yourself
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okay, gave up and bought a rebuilt carb identical to the one I had, and low and behold, it runs. Now I have no power for take off and it backfires sometimes between gears.(its a four speed stick). I checked the timing with the timing light and it was off but when I put it back to time (there was a white mark on the pulley for timing I assume, it was to the right of the ding in the pulley)it just didn't run as nice but I did it anyway. Any suggestions? I really appreciate your help, Thanks.
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Wayne
So Rick was right., it was the carb.

Here's a link to an article on how to set the timing properly

Try that first and go from there.
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okay, I'm getting real close to having it fixed. When I tried timming it, I found out that #1 plug wire was in #2 spot and three and four were not right either(I don't know how that happend because i'm the only one that has worked on this and it ran before fine). Anyway, the car runs and has plenty of power with no backfiring-but the timming marks are about 12 degrees retarded(btdc)and when I try and get it closer, it dies. The other thing is that the idle is high (2000) rpms and I have the idle screw backed all the way out. Any suggestions? Thanks again.
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Wayne
Here's some info from Rick Higgins from http://www.bugmevideo.com

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About the timing problem. I would first get all the wires and the distributor back where they should be. Likely the distributor drive is in the wrong place. When the timing marks are straight up the rotor should be either pointing to #1 or #3 which is about 2:00 o'clock or 8:00 o'clock. If the engine won't run below 2000 RPM then that is another problem. Sounds like a bad vacuum leak or dirty idle and low end circuits in the carb.
Hope this helps.
Rick
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Okay, so I get the car running good and my daughter takes it to College (250 miles away) as she is pulling into the parking garage, the oil light comes on and the the oil pressure gage says zero. I went over this with her before she left as to how important this was. I have no oil at the port for the sending unit so I go up and tow the car home. After taking out the pump , I see that the spade part of the gear is intact but is rounded out to match the cam. Needless to say, no oil is being pumped.
My question, I put the pump in 20,000 miles ago isn't that odd to be worn out after that short period of time?? I got the type of pump that has the straight oil filter adapter on it. It is a 71 engine, did I get the wrong pump or was it just a fluke that this happened? Yes, the cam is dished also. I don't have a problem getting another pump, I just want to get the right one. Any suggestions? I also need new hoses for the fan shroud to heads. I can't seem to find the right ones to fit!! Thank you for advice.
I just went to one of your websites and found the problem, the shaft came out of the drive gear just enough to stop turning in the cam. Why did this happen???
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Marc
Sounds like you got a pump that was intended for use with a flat-faced (3-rivet) cam and it didn't engage the slot in the dished cam deeply enough. It's usually possible to use such a pump if you press the shaft deeper into the gear so that it goes deep enough into the slot; in fact, places like Gene Berg and aircooled.net only sell the "3-rivet" style pump and offer directions for modifying it to use with a 4-rivet cam.
With the pump body installed in the case, slip the drive gear in but do not turn it to line up with the slot. The gear should protrude above the housing by .235: to .275", if it doesn't, remove the gear and press the shaft deeper; recheck/repeat as necessary until the desired dimension is achieved. You can do this in a vise with a pair of sockets (an 11/16" or 17mm deep socket to support the gear and a ~9mm socket to push on the shaft).
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